Rubrics & Category Descriptions

NEW!!! Game Design has been renamed “Digital Game Design” and Non-Multimedia has been renamed “Productivity Design”.  These names were changed to eliminate some minor confusion between the categories.

Director’s Note:  There have been reports that some districts using Google Apps for Education cannot access the links to the rubrics. Something about security settings for their domain not allowing student access to Public Google Docs.  I have placed a link the the PDF version of these rubrics at the bottom of this page.


3D Modeling

This category is defined as any original artwork digitally created and modeled in three dimensions using specialized software. Software may include, but not be limited to, Maya, AutoCad, Sketch Up, GollyGee Blocks, and Light Wave.

You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping.

Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC: 3D Modeling


Animation

This category is defined as an original design with the primary purpose for allowing for the motion of objects. Software may include, but not be limited to Adobe Flash, KidPix, etc.

You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping.

Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC: Animation


Audio Production

This category is defined as any original audio production that has been edited/produced with digital software. Projects may include speaking, singing, music, sounds effects, and other audio components. Software may include, but are not be limited to – Audacity, Garage Band, Wavosaur, etc…

The project must be displayed on a computer in the program in which it was created. The student should be prepared to demonstrate to judges how the software was used to create the finished project.

You may have up to 2 people on a team. Teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the category rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC: Audio Production


Device Modification

This category is for devices engineered and/or modified by students to serve a specific purpose or meet a specific goal. Device and parts do not have to be new. However, the device must be fully functional.

Some examples include, but are not limited to: Arduino, Raspberry Pi, and Makey Makey projects

Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC: Device Modification


Digital Game Design (formerly known as “Game Design”)

Digital Game Design should include original content, design, and rules of an interactive game.  Students may use the software program of their choice in order to demonstrate creativity, originality, organization, and interactivity. Students should be able to explain to judges what inspired their game idea and how they programmed their game to achieve project goals.

You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping.

Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC: Digital Game Design


Digital Photo Production

This category is defined as any computer created original project using original student photographs. The project must be displayed on a computer in the program in which it was created. The student should be prepared to demonstrate to judges how the software was used to create the finished project. A hard copy of the finished project may be displayed but is not required.

You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping.

Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC: Digital Photo Production


Graphic Design

This category is defined as any student created, computer-generated, non-animated graphic design project. Digital Photography and 3D Modeling are NOT part of this category. The student(s) must be able to display the content from the source project files using the program it was created in.

Software may include, but not be limited to, Paint, KidPix, Photoshop, Corel Draw, Illustrator, or Free Hand.

You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping.

Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC: Graphic Design


Internet Applications

Projects in this category have strength in their use on networks, either the World Wide Web or LANs (Local Area Networks). Examples of Internet application projects include web pages, web sites, chat rooms, interactive games, bulletin boards, podcasts and blogs.

Your computer is required to display this project. Internet access will not be available at the fair. All links must be captured one level deep. No tri-board displays.

You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping.

Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC: Internet Applications


Mobile Apps

An entry in this category is an app that is specifically developed for a mobile device (phone, tablet, smart-device, etc.). This app can be developed for any operating system (Android, iOS, Windows Mobile, etc.) as long as the student has a device or simulator that can run the app on the day of the fair. (This category does not include mobile-friendly web pages – please see the Internet Applications category). Pre-planning documentation materials such as a storyboard and a flowchart are required.

You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping.

Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC:  Mobile Apps


Multimedia Applications

Multimedia projects are defined as computer-based reports or creative presentations using any combination of sound and/or images with text. Possible software used for projects in this category include but are not limited to: Power Point, KidPix, AppleWorks, Astound, Storybook Weaver and HyperStudio. If appropriate to the project, a storyboard may be displayed to show sequencing of project creation.

Videos do not go in this category. Any hyperlinks need to be captured one level deep since Internet access will not be guaranteed. NO tri-boards are allowed.

Grade levels for this category are 3-4, 5-6, 7-8, 9-10, and 11-12. The computer is required to display the project.

You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping.

Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC:  Multimedia Applications


Productivity Design (formerly known as “Non Multimedia Production”)

This category is defined as any student created, computer-generated project that uses desktop publishing or general productivity software.

Entries can be developed from various non-multimedia application programs such as word processing, spreadsheets, databases or any other non-multimedia software. This category includes, but is not limited to, desktop publishing projects. Hard copies of projects may be displayed at original size to show the judges, but no large displays are allowed, including tri-board displays.

You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping.

Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC:  Productivity Design


Project Programming

Projects in this category are self-executing programs created using recognizable programming languages such as BASIC, C++, Pascal, LOGO, etc. All parts of the program must be the author’s own design. Programs must be identifiable in one of the three following categories:

  • Computer-aided instruction or educational/learning games.
  • Business or commercial applications.
  • Personal applications that, with minor alterations, could be marketed for larger commercial audiences.

You may have up to 2 people on a team but teams and individuals will compete against each other within each grade grouping.

Regardless of the length of the project, the judge time is 15 minutes. Judges may only view a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC:  Project Programming


Robotics

Projects may be constructed from kits or published drawings, modified from other devices to create new applications, or constructed from the student’s own concepts and designs. All entries must be a working and functional piece of electro-mechanical hardware in which movement and intent is controlled through student created programming. Examples of commercially available kits are robotic “arms” or robot movers, Lego and K’Nex style building kits, Capsella, VEX, and Technics style robotics kits. Devices controlled through direct, real time remote control by the student are not appropriate (ie: remote controlled cars). Once started, the robotics project should operate as a standalone independent machine without human interaction.

A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings.

Regardless of the length or complexity of the project, the judge time slots are 15 minutes in length. Judges may view only a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC: Robotics


Tech Literacy Challenge

Written exams will be given on-site for each of the grade level categories. The exams will have 50 multiple-choice questions. Questions will be vocabulary and concept oriented. They will come from the following topic areas:

  • History of computers
  • Parts of the computer
  • Peripheral computer devices
  • Uses and limitations of computers
  • General uses of common computer applications software
  • New and emerging technologies
  • The Internet
  • Social implications of computers
  • General programming (Level III, Grades 9-12, only)

Questions for the Technology Literacy Challenge will come from information generally available in textbooks and reliable sources on the Internet. A suggested list of resources is available on the Fair web site. Computer magazines and television programs have discussed some of the social implications of computers. An oral exam may be used as a tie-breaker of three or more students.

SUGGESTED RESOURCES FOR THE TECHNOLOGY LITERACY CHALLENGE:

  • Gookin, Dan. PCs for Dummies. IDG Books. January 2000. ISBN: 0764581309
  • Maran, Ruth. Computers Simplified. 4th Edition. IDG Books. September 1998. ISBN: 0764560425
  • Maran, Ruth. The Internet and World Wide Web Simplified. IDG Books. October 1999. ISBN: 0764534092
  • Rathbone, Andy. Windows 98 for Dummies. IDG Books Worldwide. June 1998. ISBN: 0764502611
  • White, Ron. How Computers Work. 5th Edition. MacMillan. 1999. ISBN: 0789721120
  • Wingate, Phillipa. The Internet for Beginners. EDCP. August 1997. ISBN: 881109290

FOR YOUNGER STUDENTS:

  • The Computer Age. Modern Media series. Barrons Educational Series. March 2000. ISBN: 076411667
  • Kalman, Bobbie. The Computer from A to Z. Crabtree. March 1998. ISBN: 0865053790
  • Parker, Steve. Computers. 20th Century Inventions Series. Raintree Steck-Vaughn. April 1997. ISBN: 0811728110
  • White, Nancy. The Magic School Bus Gets Programmed: A Book About Computers. Scholastic. Wright, David.
  • Computers. Inventors and Inventions Series. Benchmark Books. January 1996. ISBN: 0761400648

WEB SITES:

  • Computer Dictionaries, Acronyms and Glossaries
  • Triumph of the Nerds

Tech Programming Challenge

This category is an on-site event in which one student is given a series of problems that she/he must solve during the two-hour competition time. Each individual will be awarded points for each problem solved correctly. Programs will also be judged on structure, design, and organization.

Any questions regarding interpretation of the problems must be submitted in writing to the judges who may choose to answer or reject the question. The decisions of the judges are final.

Competition will begin with a briefing session. The contest problems will be distributed to all teams at the same time. At the end of the two hours, the programs developed iin the competition will be submitted for judging. The judges will use the contestants’ computers to check the solutions to the problems. Results will be announced at an awards ceremony.

Each contestant is required to bring the computer of their choice, appropriate operating system software, and programming software with which to compete. Students must also bring a power strip and extension cord to the test site. Contestants may bring an additional computer only for emergency situations in the event that one computer does not function. However, back up computers must remain unplugged and may not be used unless permission is obtained from one of the judges. Contestants may bring to the contest only the manuals for their computers. Any contestant using other resources including textbooks, published program listings, notes, or any storage media, will be disqualified.

Contestants will not be permitted to communicate with their advisors. No visitors will be allowed in the testing areas. Contestants will be monitored on a random basis. Each contestant must be able to enter their programming code, execute the solutions to the problems and save them as directed by the judges.

RUBRIC:  Tech Programming Challenge


Video Production

This category is defined as any original video project that has been edited on a computer with digital video editing software and exported into a digital video format. The project must be displayed for viewing on a computer.

A project may have a single member or a two person team, but teams and individuals will compete against each other within grade groupings.

Regardless of the length or complexity of the project, the judge time slots are 15 minutes in length. Judges may view only a portion of the actual project.

Judges will use a category rubric as a guideline for exemplary characteristics of projects in this category. Students should use the rubric as a guide for what judges are looking for.

RUBRIC: Video Production


PDF VERSION OF RUBRICS

3D Modeling
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/3DModeling.pdf

 Animation
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/Animation.pdf

Audio Production
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/AudioProduction.pdf

Device Modification
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/DeviceModification.pdf

Digital Game Design
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/GameDesign.pdf

Digital Photo Production
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/DigitalPhotoProduction.pdf

Graphic Design
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/GraphicDesign.pdf

Internet Applications
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/InternetApplications.pdf

 Mobile Apps
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/MobileApps.pdf

Multimedia Applications
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/MultimediaApplications.pdf

Productivity Design (formerly Non-Multimedia Applications)
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/Non-MultimediaApplications.pdf

Project Programming
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/ProjectProgramming.pdf

Robotics
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/Robotics.pdf

Tech Programming Challenge
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/TechProgrammingChallenge.pdf

Video Production
http://gatechfair.org/images/rubrics/VideoProduction.pdf

Tech Literacy Challenge (No Rubric for this event)
http://gatechfair.org/tech-literacy-challenge